As many people hit the road this summer for vacations and family trips, one recently filed class action serves as a reminder that certain driving activities qualify as compensable time under federal and state wage laws.

In Smith v. Allegheny Technologies, Inc., No. 2:17-cv-00911-RCM (W.D. Pa. filed 7/10/17), a metal manufacturer hired temporary replacement workers during a seven-month lockout with its union at multiple plant locations. According to the complaint, the replacement workers needed to cross active picket lines to get into the plants. To do so safely, the employer required the temporary workers to meet at a central location outside of the plant before work so that they could ride together in company vans to the plant. The company returned the employees to the central location in company vans at the end of the work day. A temporary replacement worker typically drove the van.

The complaint alleges that the time from the central location to the plant and back each day qualified as “integral and indispensable to the principal activities,” and thus counted as working time under the FLSA. The complaint claims underpayment of 10.5 to 14 hours of time, per employee, per week, in violation of the FLSA’s overtime provisions and Pennsylvania and Oregon state law. With potentially thousands of temporary workers, it’s easy to see how liability could reach the millions-of-dollars if the plaintiffs proved their case.

Key Takeaway: Employers should carefully review their travel and commuting practices to ensure that they compensate employees for all travel that qualifies as working time. As illustrated in the Smith complaint, employers should take particular note of any travel where the employer exercises control over the employee, e.g., by requiring him/her to travel from specific locations or in company vans. Of course, employers should have written, lawful travel pay policies in place. But, it’s also important to train on-site managers about potential travel-pay issues so that they know to reach out for advice before implementing a local practice that might expose the company to liability. Regular on-site audits by legal counsel or experienced HR personnel also help to catch potential issues before they turn into litigation.