On August 28, 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Wage Hour Division issued six new advisory opinion letters offering employers guidance on a range of leave and wage issues under federal law, including the application of the Family Medical Leave Act to organ donors and a no-fault attendance policy.

Continue Reading DOL Guidance on FMLA, No-Fault Attendance Policy, and Wellness Screenings

Earlier this month, the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor reissued 17 opinion letters from the Bush administration.  The letters provide employers important guidance on a wide-range of issues under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

The reinstatement marks the first publication of opinion letters since the DOL announced last June that it would bring back that form of guidance.  The Obama administration had eliminated the practice and withdrawn many existing opinion letters, including many of those reissued this month.

The reinstated letters do not upend any existing laws, but they provide important guidance and a possible safety net to employers facing similar situations. Many of the reinstated letters concerned application of Section 13(a)(1)’s overtime exemption for executive and administrative employees.  The letters also discussed whether certain bonuses must be included in the regular rate for purposes of calculating overtime and whether certain on-call time qualified as compensable working hours.

The letters contain a cover letter noting that someone had specifically asked the DOL to reissue that particular opinion letter.  Thus, employers who would like to rely on previously withdrawn opinion letters should consider asking the DOL to reissue them under its new policy.

As many people hit the road this summer for vacations and family trips, one recently filed class action serves as a reminder that certain driving activities qualify as compensable time under federal and state wage laws.

In Smith v. Allegheny Technologies, Inc., No. 2:17-cv-00911-RCM (W.D. Pa. filed 7/10/17), a metal manufacturer hired temporary replacement workers during a seven-month lockout with its union at multiple plant locations. According to the complaint, the replacement workers needed to cross active picket lines to get into the plants. To do so safely, the employer required the temporary workers to meet at a central location outside of the plant before work so that they could ride together in company vans to the plant. The company returned the employees to the central location in company vans at the end of the work day. A temporary replacement worker typically drove the van.

The complaint alleges that the time from the central location to the plant and back each day qualified as “integral and indispensable to the principal activities,” and thus counted as working time under the FLSA. The complaint claims underpayment of 10.5 to 14 hours of time, per employee, per week, in violation of the FLSA’s overtime provisions and Pennsylvania and Oregon state law. With potentially thousands of temporary workers, it’s easy to see how liability could reach the millions-of-dollars if the plaintiffs proved their case.

Key Takeaway: Employers should carefully review their travel and commuting practices to ensure that they compensate employees for all travel that qualifies as working time. As illustrated in the Smith complaint, employers should take particular note of any travel where the employer exercises control over the employee, e.g., by requiring him/her to travel from specific locations or in company vans. Of course, employers should have written, lawful travel pay policies in place. But, it’s also important to train on-site managers about potential travel-pay issues so that they know to reach out for advice before implementing a local practice that might expose the company to liability. Regular on-site audits by legal counsel or experienced HR personnel also help to catch potential issues before they turn into litigation.